Mari Boine is an artist without equal. Her interpretation of the Sámi musical heritage has won her a truly international audience. Across the world she has come to represent the epitome of the merger between age-old musical heritage -with a universal depth of message and emotion- and progressive aspects of today’s music. With Boine the ancient tradition and the timeless mystery of the Joik –the Sámi vocal tradition- is given new life and new audiences by a zealous pursuit of modern elements. Her music incorporates many different genres, she makes use of innovative sounds and modern technologies and consistently finds new directions in which to take the music.

“It ain’t necessarily evil” is evidence of this mindset. It is actually Boine’s second collection of remixes. The first, 2001’s Odda Hamis, featured contributions from Jah Wobble and Biosphere amongst others. This time around it is Sweden’s incredible The Knife, renowned Berlin producer Henrik Schwartz, and Norwegian zeitgeisty names like 120 Days and Mungolian Jetset (DJ Strangefruit and Knut Sćvik) that have reinterpreted Boine’s unique visionary music. Most of the songs are taken from Boine’s latest studio album Idjagieas (In the hand of the night), which came in 2007 to brilliant international reviews. But also included is her majestic theme song Elle from the recent Nils Gaup movie about the Kautokeino rebellion and the plight of the Sámi people.

The meditative essence of Boine’s music is given new, sometimes disturbing sometimes lazy and sunny, contexts. And, in the words of one critic; new ground is broken by the notion of disco meditations. By enlisting such people as The Knife and 120 Days her profound and trance inducing music reaches the sphere of the happening Indie underground, and not least, the dance floor!

More than anything the record and the remix contributors is evidence of her stature amongst musicians both home and abroad: More than twenty years, and ten albums, after her debut Mari Boine is a highly respected musical visionary who inspires musicians and listeners of all kinds everywhere. Her position sees her travelling incessantly, bringing her personal art and the rich and haunting essence of her people’s culture to venues around the world. Her concerts are always highly anticipated and appreciated events; concerts that seem more than just a musical experience but one of journeying in both time and space.
As Mari says herself, “the key to experiencing my music is participation, for this is not something you can simply sit back and receive, it is a kind of journey one must partake in”.

With “It ain’t necessarily evil,” which was released on March 31st, the notion of participation is reiterated, and the new way of doing it is perhaps by dancing.sd
 
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