It became clear last week that EMI was facing a considerable set-back in the company’s promotion campaign for Lene Marlin’s much anticipated second album “Another Day”. More than ten days prior to its official release, the entire album was available for illegal download at a number of servers – spreading rapidly around the globe. EMI Norway and the UK Head Office took swift action to localise the source of the internet leak – the culprit was soon found to be one of Norwegian firm Ergo Group (a Norway Post subsidiary) severs that was functioning as a rented-out web-hotel. The offending terminal was immediately shut down but damage was already done – the album was spreading fast on the net appearing on servers as far away as China.

Lene Marlin’s second album “Another Day” is scheduled for official release on September 22.

Head of EMI Norway Per Eirik Johansen initially signalised a massive lawsuit to crack down on the damaging internet piracy activity. Ergo Group immediately shut down the pirate server and filed a complaint to police authorities.

In the wake of the internet piracy scandal, several independent Norwegian record stores signalled that fewer units of Marlin’s upcoming album would be ordered – some have reduced orders with as much as 75%. The larger chains such as Platekompaniet and Free Record Shop are not planning a shift in sales plans however, and will not reduce the amount of ordered CDs.

Legal snippets from Marlin’s upcoming album can be heard here. sd
 
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Music Industry, Internet, Media, CD Releases